The Sculpture Garden

Located within the grounds of the Cherry Center, the Geraldine M. and Tom R. Houston Memorial Sculpture Garden provides an exhibition of contemporary American outdoor sculpture. The garden contains five or more artworks at any given time, including works on loan by preeminent Monterey County artists.

The informal garden includes a canopy of Monterey pine and native live oak, flowering trees and perennials. The circular path features seating for rest and reflection amongst the oaks. Open daily from 9:00 am – 5:00 pm.

“Acrobats”
Aristides Demetrios (1932-2021)
Metal

Aristides Burton Demetrios was born and raised in Massachusetts. His father, George Demetrios, was a classical sculptor, trained by Bourdelle (a student of Rodin). His mother, Virginia Lee Burton, was the renowned author and illustrator of children’s books and the daughter of Jeanne D’Orge (Mrs. Carl Cherry). Since the late 20th century, Demetrios has designed, fabricated and installed a large number of commissioned works for the gardens of private collectors,

“Totem”
Greg Hawthorne (b. 1951)
Steel

“Totem”
Greg Hawthorne (b. 1951)
Steel

Greg Hawthorne believes art to be “a continuous process, influenced by all aspects of a changing society.” His provocative imagery incorporates his three loves: painting, sculpting and design. Hawthorne’s artwork is displayed in hundreds of private and corporate collections worldwide.

“In Balance”
Stefani Esta
Steel and Stone

Stefani Esta, contemporary American visual artist, works from her California studio creating three-dimensional and wall sculptures from stone, steel, copper, brass, and mixed media. Her work has been featured in galleries, museums, and celebrated in private collections across the country.

“Primavera”
Rodney Winfield (1925-2017)
Ceramic on Board

Artist Rodney Winfield was born in New York City in 1925. He was a renowned painter, stained glass artist and sculptor with works in public and private collections all over the world. He designed the Space Window at the National Cathedral in Washington DC. Winfield taught at Maryville University in St. Louis, MO for 26 years. After retiring, he moved to Carmel with his wife Betty and continued to work until his death in 2018.

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“Blue Sign”
Arthur Comings (1941-2015)
Mixed Media

“Astrolabe”
Arthur Comings (1941-2015)
Iron

Arthur Comings created assemblage with found objects and industrial artifacts for thirty years following
Bruce Connor’s first Funk Art show at Sam’s Café, Berkeley in the late 70’s.

“Counterpoint #3”
Richard Mayer (1935-2017)
Painted Steel

Richard Alan Mayer was a sculptor and former San Francisco Arts Commissioner noted for his advocacy of artists’ rights. His work led to one-man exhibitions at art galleries across the country and in dozens of group shows at galleries and museums throughout the Bay Area.

“Sunspot”
Norma Lewis (1931-2010)
Painted Steel

Norma Lewis was educated at the University of Texas, the Art Student’s League in New York City and Washington University in St. Louis. Her bronze sculptures and paintings are owned by private parties and institutions in Asia, Europe and North and South America.

“Three Crows”
Eleen Auvil (1927-2022)
Bronze

“Rocky Mountain High”
Eleen Auvil (1927-2022)
Bronze

For the past thirty years, sculpture has been Eleen Auvil’s primary focus. Her materials include bronze, copper, stone, wood, handmade paper and mixed media. She has trained and taught widely, received numerous awards, and exhibited
across the United States over a career spanning nearly six decades.

“Insurgent”
Bruce Beasley (b. 1939)
Bronze

Bruce Beasley is an American abstract expressionist sculptor born in Los Angeles and currently living and working in Oakland, California. His work can be found in the permanent collection of 40 art museums around the world,

“Ag-sthetic”
Selene Ogden  (b. 1973)
Ceramic

Selene Ogden was born in Carmel, and resides in Carmel Valley, California. Her ceramic sculptures are inspired by organic forms juxtaposed against the hard cut edges of human-made objects. She has been influenced by California’s agricultural landscape and machinery, as well as the decay of ancient architecture.